MAIL CONFIG (Very urgent) 
Author Message
 MAIL CONFIG (Very urgent)

Hi All,

I was usinf SMTP , CDONTS to send mail from my SQL server.

I use the below SP:

CREATE  PROCEDURE AIS_SEND_MAIL




AS



begin
-- Creating the mail object.


begin
    -- Return failure flag

end

--Sending mail


begin
    -- Return failure flag

end

--Destroying the mail object


begin
    -- Return failure flag

end
end

Problem:

Currently in my client side SMTP, CDONTS are not supported. I need to use
SQL MAIL. Is it possible for me to create OLE object  for SQL MAIL.
What is the OLE Object for SQL mail?

Regards
Hari.



Sun, 15 May 2005 08:27:07 GMT
 MAIL CONFIG (Very urgent)

No OLE object necessary for SQL Mail.  Look at xp_sendmail in BOL.  It is
just a procedure that can be called to send mail, and we use it all the
time.  Note that SQL Mail must be set up properly for xp_sendmail to
succeed.

Also, read all about configuring SQL Mail; it can be tricky if you have
never done it before.  I wrote something a long time ago to help out
customers, perhaps it will help get you started.  There is no substitute for
BOL and your own experiments though.

James

Introduction to Concepts
At first, the configuration of SQL Mail can seem like a confusing array of
different, seemingly disparate activities.  By introducing the concepts and
providing the big picture here first, hopefully the process will seem more
intuitive and wont get lost in the details.

First and foremost, for SQL Server to send email using your organizations
email system, SQL Server must be just like any other user in your
organization.  Even though SQL Server is not a person, in many ways it will
be set up just like any real user.  SQL Server must have a domain login
account, and must have a dedicated email account.  SQL Server must login
using its domain account when it starts.  There must be an email profile
and email client on the SQL Server server, and that email profile must be
configured for the SQL Server domain account login.  These are all things
that a real person needs in order to be able to logon to an NT domain, and
send and receive email.

Basically, we want to be in a position to physically sit down at the SQL
Server server, logon as, say,  SQLServerAccount, bring up an email client
like Microsoft Outlook, and send and receive email using, say, the SQLMail
account.  Other users of your email system will see SQLMail in their
address book, and should be able to send it a test message that you can open
and read.  In fact, performing each of these little exercises will be part
of the configuration process described in the sections below.  When these
prerequisites are complete, the final few configuration changes to SQL
Server are easy.

The points below highlight the steps mentioned above, and each will be
covered in detail in the remain sections of this chapter.

1.      Create a special NT Domain user account named SQLServerAccount,
and assign special rights to that new account so that it can be used by SQL
Server.

2.      Create a special email account name SQLMail.

3.      Configure an email profile on the SQL Server server for the
SQLServerAccount user created in step 1, and have that profile use the
SQLMail email account created in step 2.  Test the profile by
sending/receiving email to/from the SQLMail address.

4.      Configure SQL Server and the SQL Server Agent to use the
SQLServerAccount, that you created in step 1, when they start.

5.      Configure SQL Mail to use the profile that you created in step 3 to
use the SQLMail email account.

6.      Configure SQL Agent Mail to use the profile that you created in step
3 to use the SQLMail email account.



Sun, 15 May 2005 19:03:42 GMT
 MAIL CONFIG (Very urgent)
Thanks for posting this.  What book is this quote from?  I
would like to read the rest of the chapter.

Quote:
>-----Original Message-----
>No OLE object necessary for SQL Mail.  Look at

xp_sendmail in BOL.  It is
Quote:
>just a procedure that can be called to send mail, and we
use it all the
>time.  Note that SQL Mail must be set up properly for
xp_sendmail to
>succeed.

>Also, read all about configuring SQL Mail; it can be
tricky if you have
>never done it before.  I wrote something a long time ago
to help out
>customers, perhaps it will help get you started.  There

is no substitute for
Quote:
>BOL and your own experiments though.

>James

>Introduction to Concepts
>At first, the configuration of SQL Mail can seem like a
confusing array of
>different, seemingly disparate activities.  By

introducing the concepts and
Quote:
>providing the "big picture" here first, hopefully the

process will seem more
Quote:
>intuitive and won't get lost in the details.

>First and foremost, for SQL Server to send email using
your organizations
>email system, SQL Server must be just like any other user
in your
>organization.  Even though SQL Server is not a person, in
many ways it will
>be set up just like any "real" user.  SQL Server must
have a domain login
>account, and must have a dedicated email account.  SQL
Server must login
>using it's domain account when it starts.  There must be
an email profile
>and email client on the SQL Server server, and that email
profile must be
>configured for the SQL Server domain account login.  

These are all things
Quote:
>that a real person needs in order to be able to logon to
an NT domain, and
>send and receive email.

>Basically, we want to be in a position to physically sit
down at the SQL
>Server server, logon as, say,  "SQLServerAccount", bring
up an email client
>like Microsoft Outlook, and send and receive email using,
say, the "SQLMail"
>account.  Other users of your email system will

see "SQLMail" in their
Quote:
>address book, and should be able to send it a test

message that you can open
Quote:
>and read.  In fact, performing each of these little

exercises will be part
Quote:
>of the configuration process described in the sections
below.  When these
>prerequisites are complete, the final few configuration
changes to SQL
>Server are easy.

>The points below highlight the steps mentioned above, and
each will be
>covered in detail in the remain sections of this chapter.

>1.      Create a special NT Domain user account

named "SQLServerAccount",

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>and assign special rights to that new account so that it
can be used by SQL
>Server.

>2.      Create a special email account name "SQLMail".

>3.      Configure an email profile on the SQL Server
server for the
>"SQLServerAccount" user created in step 1, and have that
profile use the
>"SQLMail" email account created in step 2.  Test the
profile by
>sending/receiving email to/from the "SQLMail" address.

>4.      Configure SQL Server and the SQL Server Agent to
use the
>"SQLServerAccount", that you created in step 1, when they
start.

>5.      Configure SQL Mail to use the profile that you

created in step 3 to

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
>use the "SQLMail" email account.

>6.      Configure SQL Agent Mail to use the profile that
you created in step
>3 to use the "SQLMail" email account.

>.



Tue, 31 May 2005 23:01:29 GMT
 MAIL CONFIG (Very urgent)
Sorry, its not from a book, but from a chapter in our products (called
RS-SQL) manual.  Much of the rest of that chapter is specific to our
product, or simply walks through the various dialogs to setup SQL Mail.  The
text high-level overview of SQLMail is the best part of the chapter, and I'm
pleased folks have found it helpful.  SQLMail is great, and it's not really
hard to setup once you understand the basics.

James Hunter Ross



Wed, 01 Jun 2005 01:15:00 GMT
 
 [ 4 post ] 

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