Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3) 
Author Message
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)

Hello,

I've been struggling lately because I'd like to make
a career change but am not sure which IT field I want to switch to. I'm
interested in
Oracle database administration, systems administration, and e-commerce,
and I'm trying to figure out which of these areas interests me the most.

I took two classes on databases at the university a while ago, and I
enjoyed them very much. Besides this, I don't have any experience with
databases.

There are 2 main points that hold me back from going into Database
Administration, that is:
1.  A lot of overtime or lots of hours involved.
2.  High Stress.
In your opinion, to what extent are these two points true? For instance,
would you consider
database administration to be one far more stressful than systems
administration or other web
related jobs (such as webmastere-commerce expert)?

Also, it sounds like it is hard to find a job as an Oracle DBA  
when all you have is Oracle's DBA Certification (from OCP) but no
exsperience.
My understanding is that, for this reason, people who want to become an
Oracle DBA
must first work in some database related job.
I have a couple of questions on this:
1. Which jobs would help me gain the necessary experience to later become
a DBA?
(d

2. How long would I have to wait before I can go into DB administration?

Thank you very much for your time,
H_H



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)

Hello,

I've been struggling lately because I'd like to make
a career change but am not sure which IT field I want to switch to. I'm
interested in
Oracle database administration, systems administration, and e-commerce,
and I'm trying to figure out which of these areas interests me the most.

I took two classes on databases at the university a while ago, and I
enjoyed them very much. Besides this, I don't have any experience with
databases.

There are 2 main points that hold me back from going into Database
Administration, that is:
1.  A lot of overtime or lots of hours involved.
2.  High Stress.
In your opinion, to what extent are these two points true? For instance,
would you consider
database administration to be one far more stressful than systems
administration or other web
related jobs (such as webmastere-commerce expert)?

Also, it sounds like it is hard to find a job as an Oracle DBA  
when all you have is Oracle's DBA Certification (from OCP) but no
exsperience.
My understanding is that, for this reason, people who want to become an
Oracle DBA
must first work in some database related job.
I have a couple of questions on this:
1. Which jobs would help me gain the necessary experience to later become
a DBA?
(d

2. How long would I have to wait before I can go into DB administration?

Thank you very much for your time,
H_H



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
Just an attempt at an answer.

Both 1 and 2 can be involved. However, they largely depend on
- getting enough resources to build a well-organised environment
- the capability, partly by means of scripts, to act proactive (ie predict
future problems)
- the capability of developing robust maintenance free procedures to
maintain your databases.
This will not say disaster will never strike, but at least you will be
prepared for it.
The biggest problem area usually is the first item in my list as management
consistently tries to cut back on cost, and they see that extra disk, and
they don't see your stress and/or your overtime, as you are getting paid
anyway.
If you have a well organised database (or a database where someone is saying
'you are not allowed to do this because it is not in the Service Level
Agreement'), being a DBA can be a parttime job. If you are really tied to
your screen for 40 hours trying to survive something is really wrong.

As for jobs:
first of all, as a DBA you really should know SQL very well,
You also should know how to tune your statements and to tune your database.
Those are the aspects of your work that really involve creativity, making
backups and installing software is going to be a routine matter soon, and of
course it doesn't happen frequently.
So you should try to be on the 'other side', ie being a developer first,
before becoming a DBA. I would recommend trying to find a job where they
host Oracle on Unix, you will be forced to learn vi and korn shell and the
sooner you do that the better, you'r going to need it anyway.

Just my 2 Eurocents and comments are appreciated.

Regards,

Sybrand Bakker, Oracle DBA


Quote:
> Hello,

> I've been struggling lately because I'd like to make
> a career change but am not sure which IT field I want to switch to. I'm
> interested in
> Oracle database administration, systems administration, and e-commerce,
> and I'm trying to figure out which of these areas interests me the most.

> I took two classes on databases at the university a while ago, and I
> enjoyed them very much. Besides this, I don't have any experience with
> databases.

> There are 2 main points that hold me back from going into Database
> Administration, that is:
> 1.  A lot of overtime or lots of hours involved.
> 2.  High Stress.
> In your opinion, to what extent are these two points true? For instance,
> would you consider
> database administration to be one far more stressful than systems
> administration or other web
> related jobs (such as webmastere-commerce expert)?

> Also, it sounds like it is hard to find a job as an Oracle DBA
> when all you have is Oracle's DBA Certification (from OCP) but no
> exsperience.
> My understanding is that, for this reason, people who want to become an
> Oracle DBA
> must first work in some database related job.
> I have a couple of questions on this:
> 1. Which jobs would help me gain the necessary experience to later become
> a DBA?
> (d

> 2. How long would I have to wait before I can go into DB administration?

> Thank you very much for your time,
> H_H



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
If you have no OS type admin experience maybe DBA is not for you.

If you have no developer experience in a database environment maybe DBA
is not for you.

If you do not understand that high stress and long hours do not have to
happen to a well prepared admin maybe DBA is not for you.

If you understand how to get paid enormous amounts of money, well, OK
you can be a DBA.  Welcome aboard brother!
--
---------------------------------------------------------
Steven Hauser

---------------------------------------------------------



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)


Quote:
> Just an attempt at an answer.

> Both 1 and 2 can be involved. However, they largely depend on
> - getting enough resources to build a well-organised environment
> - the capability, partly by means of scripts, to act proactive (ie
predict
> future problems)
> - the capability of developing robust maintenance free procedures to
> maintain your databases.
> This will not say disaster will never strike, but at least you will be
> prepared for it.
> The biggest problem area usually is the first item in my list as
management
> consistently tries to cut back on cost, and they see that extra disk,
and
> they don't see your stress and/or your overtime, as you are getting
paid
> anyway.
> If you have a well organised database (or a database where someone is
saying
> 'you are not allowed to do this because it is not in the Service Level
> Agreement'), being a DBA can be a parttime job. If you are really
tied to
> your screen for 40 hours trying to survive something is really wrong.

Aren't you Oracle DBA ? It all seems somehow familiar to me. :-) I
think that time which DBA should spent with his database is
determinated by two factors, his own abilities and complexity of
database.
One of my job is to take care of one web system. I do this as
parttime job and have no problems. I just routinely check Oracle logs
(everything is correct), check disk space (oh shit, more and more disk
space is full, if management will not decide on archive policies soon,
we will be deep in trouble), check OS logs (everything OK, thanks God
for Unix), check security logs on gate computer (oh new record, we have
twenty competitors this week and the winner of hack-my-server online
game for this week is .... and his price will be angry letter to his
ISP), quick check of proxy logs, which {*filter*} pages are most popular
now (oh, this one is new even for me), read mail from users (where is
delete all command ?) and that's all. Just few hours weekly.

My problem with management is that they are don't understand why is
necessary to spent new money for two year old system which was bought
for really big money. I'm usually just giving my advice and not take
any more actions. And when system's response is really bad, because
half of memory operations are in swap file and users are complaining to
their bosses, I just say: "Are you remember that xxx thousand bucks
which you decided to save on memory six months ago ?" I think that this
is a better way than have wars about all the money you need for your
systems. After while management will learn that money spend on IT are
money spend on effectiveness of their bussiness.

--
--------------------------------------------------
Dusan Bolek

senior DBA, HP-UX root, Linux root, NT administrator, webmaster, web
designer, DW designer,
technician, SAP consultant, RTC designer, VB + VBA programmer, C and
C++ programmer,
shell programmer, Java programmer and everything else that they've told
me to do ...

Sent via Deja.com http://www.***.com/
Before you buy.



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)

Quote:

>There are 2 main points that hold me back from going into Database
>Administration, that is:
>1.  A lot of overtime or lots of hours involved.
>2.  High Stress.
>In your opinion, to what extent are these two points true?

Depends how good you are at DBA :-)

If you're good, you'll automate as much as possible, and spend most of
the time surfing the web (not that I would do such a thing ;)).

You have to be prepared for some high stress, high overtime moments,
such as losing a hard drive, or other events catastrophic to your
database, but these tend to be fairly rare.

The only other time you really suffer long hours is when a new project
is being moved into production, depending on how smoothly it goes.

--
Mark Styles - Oracle/Unix developer and DBA
http://www.lambic.co.uk



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
Hmm

For me that last is about one new project every 2-3 months. It's been that
way for the last 18months. I'd be surprised if this was actually that
unusual these days. Sure you don't replace your ERP package that often. But
that new web data entry system that relies on packaged procedures, or this
new 'knowledge management'/'proactive resource scheduling' system or isn't
it about time we migrated our systems to Oracle 8 or well you get the
picture.

--
Niall Litchfield
Oracle DBA
Audit Commission UK

Quote:



> >There are 2 main points that hold me back from going into Database
> >Administration, that is:
> >1.  A lot of overtime or lots of hours involved.
> >2.  High Stress.
> >In your opinion, to what extent are these two points true?

> Depends how good you are at DBA :-)

> If you're good, you'll automate as much as possible, and spend most of
> the time surfing the web (not that I would do such a thing ;)).

> You have to be prepared for some high stress, high overtime moments,
> such as losing a hard drive, or other events catastrophic to your
> database, but these tend to be fairly rare.

> The only other time you really suffer long hours is when a new project
> is being moved into production, depending on how smoothly it goes.

> --
> Mark Styles - Oracle/Unix developer and DBA
> http://www.lambic.co.uk



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
Just out of interest how many hours do you work per week. And is that in a
24/7 environment or a 9-5 place.

--
Niall Litchfield
Oracle DBA
Audit Commission UK


Quote:
> If you do not understand that high stress and long hours do not have to
> happen to a well prepared admin maybe DBA is not for you.



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
I've done a quick search but I can't find "part 1" and "part 2" I'm
also very interested in any responses as well. I'm just begun Oracle 8
right now, ILT and while i'm e{*filter*}d about the technology and the
prospects of a possible bright career i'm also worried about
positioning myself properly for the IT world as I do not come from a
comp backgroud other than being a hobbyist.

I'm thinking about going back to school for a semester after this
certification to do a UNIX course and maybe some Java since many here
seem to suggest that being recruited for developer skills may be a good
way to enter the market coupled with your OCP.

If i'm running Oracle 8.05 on NT at home does anyone have any
suggestions on how to maximize my learning process? I'm thinking of
creating a pretend database and begin learning about networking in
general in order to get more experience because i'm not getting it
while working at my present job (Healh Care).

Thanks and regards,

Bill



Quote:
> Hello,

> I've been struggling lately because I'd like to make
> a career change but am not sure which IT field I want to switch to.
I'm
> interested in
> Oracle database administration, systems administration, and e-
commerce,
> and I'm trying to figure out which of these areas interests me the
most.

> I took two classes on databases at the university a while ago, and I
> enjoyed them very much. Besides this, I don't have any experience with
> databases.

> There are 2 main points that hold me back from going into Database
> Administration, that is:
> 1.  A lot of overtime or lots of hours involved.
> 2.  High Stress.
> In your opinion, to what extent are these two points true? For
instance,
> would you consider
> database administration to be one far more stressful than systems
> administration or other web
> related jobs (such as webmastere-commerce expert)?

> Also, it sounds like it is hard to find a job as an Oracle DBA
> when all you have is Oracle's DBA Certification (from OCP) but no
> exsperience.
> My understanding is that, for this reason, people who want to become
an
> Oracle DBA
> must first work in some database related job.
> I have a couple of questions on this:
> 1. Which jobs would help me gain the necessary experience to later
become
> a DBA?
> (d

> 2. How long would I have to wait before I can go into DB
administration?

> Thank you very much for your time,
> H_H

Sent via Deja.com http://www.***.com/
Before you buy.


Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
Niall Litchfield begs the question:

Quote:
>Just out of interest how many hours do you work per week. And is that in a
>24/7 environment or a 9-5 place.

24/6.9 with Sunday as the designated maintain period.  I bill about
36 hours per week, wander in at about 10 or 11 in the morning, take off
early to fish.  And yes I do some Sundays. But I take off Friday or Tuesday
on those weeks.  

Of course, we run Unix, have big fault tolerant Terabyte disk arrays, hot
backups to tape robots that have 10's of drives per robot and
a seasoned group of pro-active Unix admins.

We also do not let people develop code or log onto production
systems and use a change control process which keeps systems
stable and changes controlled.

We also practice disaster recovery scenarios and goof around with
our software so we know it and any recovery is just routine instead of
a thrill ride down the spiral of death.

If chaos reigns in your environment then it will rain chaos.

--
---------------------------------------------------------
Steven Hauser

---------------------------------------------------------



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
Thanks

always interesting to see what people think of as standard hours. I tend to
do the same. I've met people 'not into the long hours culture' who average
maybe 50 a week!. I will probably pich your chaos reigns comment oin the
future - it is truly apposite.

--
Niall Litchfield
Oracle DBA
Audit Commission UK

Quote:
> Niall Litchfield begs the question:
> >Just out of interest how many hours do you work per week. And is that in
a
> >24/7 environment or a 9-5 place.

> 24/6.9 with Sunday as the designated maintain period.  I bill about
> 36 hours per week, wander in at about 10 or 11 in the morning, take off
> early to fish.  And yes I do some Sundays. But I take off Friday or
Tuesday
> on those weeks.

> Of course, we run Unix, have big fault tolerant Terabyte disk arrays, hot
> backups to tape robots that have 10's of drives per robot and
> a seasoned group of pro-active Unix admins.

> We also do not let people develop code or log onto production
> systems and use a change control process which keeps systems
> stable and changes controlled.

> We also practice disaster recovery scenarios and goof around with
> our software so we know it and any recovery is just routine instead of
> a thrill ride down the spiral of death.

> If chaos reigns in your environment then it will rain chaos.

> --
> ---------------------------------------------------------
> Steven Hauser

> ---------------------------------------------------------



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
No offense taken. BTW, at this point in time i'm locked into this
course so i'm going to finish it. I figure that i'll be doing 8i right
after this or will be polishing up developer/sql skills as well. I
guess i've got no choice! :)



Quote:
> Without wishing to seem trite, my only real suggestion is to drop
Oracle 8
> as quickly as possible, and install 8.1.6 or better, and concentrate
on the
> 8i material.

> I speak as one who thought the sun was 8.0.x but who has recently
discovered
> that it was merely a stepping stone to the much better things in 8i.

> And no, I don't have Oracle shares (I have Seagate shares instead,
whihc
> makes much more sense).

> Regards
> HJR
> --
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
----
> Opinions expressed are my own, and not those of Oracle Corporation
> Oracle DBA Resources:

http://www.***.com/

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
----



> > I've done a quick search but I can't find "part 1" and "part 2" I'm
> > also very interested in any responses as well. I'm just begun
Oracle 8
> > right now, ILT and while i'm e{*filter*}d about the technology and the
> > prospects of a possible bright career i'm also worried about
> > positioning myself properly for the IT world as I do not come from a
> > comp backgroud other than being a hobbyist.

> > I'm thinking about going back to school for a semester after this
> > certification to do a UNIX course and maybe some Java since many
here
> > seem to suggest that being recruited for developer skills may be a
good
> > way to enter the market coupled with your OCP.

> > If i'm running Oracle 8.05 on NT at home does anyone have any
> > suggestions on how to maximize my learning process? I'm thinking of
> > creating a pretend database and begin learning about networking in
> > general in order to get more experience because i'm not getting it
> > while working at my present job (Healh Care).

> > Thanks and regards,

> > Bill



> > > Hello,

> > > I've been struggling lately because I'd like to make
> > > a career change but am not sure which IT field I want to switch
to.
> > I'm
> > > interested in
> > > Oracle database administration, systems administration, and e-
> > commerce,
> > > and I'm trying to figure out which of these areas interests me the
> > most.

> > > I took two classes on databases at the university a while ago,
and I
> > > enjoyed them very much. Besides this, I don't have any experience
with
> > > databases.

> > > There are 2 main points that hold me back from going into Database
> > > Administration, that is:
> > > 1.  A lot of overtime or lots of hours involved.
> > > 2.  High Stress.
> > > In your opinion, to what extent are these two points true? For
> > instance,
> > > would you consider
> > > database administration to be one far more stressful than systems
> > > administration or other web
> > > related jobs (such as webmastere-commerce expert)?

> > > Also, it sounds like it is hard to find a job as an Oracle DBA
> > > when all you have is Oracle's DBA Certification (from OCP) but no
> > > exsperience.
> > > My understanding is that, for this reason, people who want to
become
> > an
> > > Oracle DBA
> > > must first work in some database related job.
> > > I have a couple of questions on this:
> > > 1. Which jobs would help me gain the necessary experience to later
> > become
> > > a DBA?
> > > (d

> > > 2. How long would I have to wait before I can go into DB
> > administration?

> > > Thank you very much for your time,
> > > H_H

> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.***.com/
> > Before you buy.

Sent via Deja.com http://www.***.com/
Before you buy.


Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
The primary difference between 8 and 8i is more bugs.  OK, I'm only kidding,
all versions of Oracle have a lot of bugs.
I *do* like 8i, but I need bug spray to support it.

I set cursor_sharing=FORCE and I get 50-100 core dumps daily.  I try to
export and I get "invalid column name" errors when exporting synonyms
because Oracle incorrectly thought the java package had been installed.
Then after resolving that I get failed imports with 20001 errors because
import under 8i can't seem to handle the statistics generated on the
exported database so I have to set analyze=n in the parfile.  Then, I leave
work after being there 12 hours to accomplish 4 hours of work if I didn't
have to account for troubleshooting bug time.

PS, for those of you who have 8i, check to see if you have a view called
v$dlm_traffic_controller, I have yet to see the view created with either an
install or upgrade.(another bug?)(it fails with a table or view does not
exist).Also gv$_dlm_traffic_controller.

Oh well, if it weren't for problems I might be unemployed.  And, by the way
Howard, neither 8 nor 8i are "the sun".  That is reserved for the bug free
9i.(cough, cough).

I love Oracle, I just needed to vent after another long day.  Thank you for
your support.

--
Dave A



Quote:
> Without wishing to seem trite, my only real suggestion is to drop Oracle 8
> as quickly as possible, and install 8.1.6 or better, and concentrate on
the
> 8i material.

> I speak as one who thought the sun was 8.0.x but who has recently
discovered
> that it was merely a stepping stone to the much better things in 8i.

> And no, I don't have Oracle shares (I have Seagate shares instead, whihc
> makes much more sense).

> Regards
> HJR
> --
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Opinions expressed are my own, and not those of Oracle Corporation
> Oracle DBA Resources:               http://www.***.com/
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------



> > I've done a quick search but I can't find "part 1" and "part 2" I'm
> > also very interested in any responses as well. I'm just begun Oracle 8
> > right now, ILT and while i'm e{*filter*}d about the technology and the
> > prospects of a possible bright career i'm also worried about
> > positioning myself properly for the IT world as I do not come from a
> > comp backgroud other than being a hobbyist.

> > I'm thinking about going back to school for a semester after this
> > certification to do a UNIX course and maybe some Java since many here
> > seem to suggest that being recruited for developer skills may be a good
> > way to enter the market coupled with your OCP.

> > If i'm running Oracle 8.05 on NT at home does anyone have any
> > suggestions on how to maximize my learning process? I'm thinking of
> > creating a pretend database and begin learning about networking in
> > general in order to get more experience because i'm not getting it
> > while working at my present job (Healh Care).

> > Thanks and regards,

> > Bill



> > > Hello,

> > > I've been struggling lately because I'd like to make
> > > a career change but am not sure which IT field I want to switch to.
> > I'm
> > > interested in
> > > Oracle database administration, systems administration, and e-
> > commerce,
> > > and I'm trying to figure out which of these areas interests me the
> > most.

> > > I took two classes on databases at the university a while ago, and I
> > > enjoyed them very much. Besides this, I don't have any experience with
> > > databases.

> > > There are 2 main points that hold me back from going into Database
> > > Administration, that is:
> > > 1.  A lot of overtime or lots of hours involved.
> > > 2.  High Stress.
> > > In your opinion, to what extent are these two points true? For
> > instance,
> > > would you consider
> > > database administration to be one far more stressful than systems
> > > administration or other web
> > > related jobs (such as webmastere-commerce expert)?

> > > Also, it sounds like it is hard to find a job as an Oracle DBA
> > > when all you have is Oracle's DBA Certification (from OCP) but no
> > > exsperience.
> > > My understanding is that, for this reason, people who want to become
> > an
> > > Oracle DBA
> > > must first work in some database related job.
> > > I have a couple of questions on this:
> > > 1. Which jobs would help me gain the necessary experience to later
> > become
> > > a DBA?
> > > (d

> > > 2. How long would I have to wait before I can go into DB
> > administration?

> > > Thank you very much for your time,
> > > H_H

> > Sent via Deja.com http://www.***.com/
> > Before you buy.



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)
Without wishing to seem trite, my only real suggestion is to drop Oracle 8
as quickly as possible, and install 8.1.6 or better, and concentrate on the
8i material.

I speak as one who thought the sun was 8.0.x but who has recently discovered
that it was merely a stepping stone to the much better things in 8i.

And no, I don't have Oracle shares (I have Seagate shares instead, whihc
makes much more sense).

Regards
HJR
--
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Opinions expressed are my own, and not those of Oracle Corporation
Oracle DBA Resources:               http://www.***.com/
--------------------------------------------------------------------------


Quote:
> I've done a quick search but I can't find "part 1" and "part 2" I'm
> also very interested in any responses as well. I'm just begun Oracle 8
> right now, ILT and while i'm e{*filter*}d about the technology and the
> prospects of a possible bright career i'm also worried about
> positioning myself properly for the IT world as I do not come from a
> comp backgroud other than being a hobbyist.

> I'm thinking about going back to school for a semester after this
> certification to do a UNIX course and maybe some Java since many here
> seem to suggest that being recruited for developer skills may be a good
> way to enter the market coupled with your OCP.

> If i'm running Oracle 8.05 on NT at home does anyone have any
> suggestions on how to maximize my learning process? I'm thinking of
> creating a pretend database and begin learning about networking in
> general in order to get more experience because i'm not getting it
> while working at my present job (Healh Care).

> Thanks and regards,

> Bill



> > Hello,

> > I've been struggling lately because I'd like to make
> > a career change but am not sure which IT field I want to switch to.
> I'm
> > interested in
> > Oracle database administration, systems administration, and e-
> commerce,
> > and I'm trying to figure out which of these areas interests me the
> most.

> > I took two classes on databases at the university a while ago, and I
> > enjoyed them very much. Besides this, I don't have any experience with
> > databases.

> > There are 2 main points that hold me back from going into Database
> > Administration, that is:
> > 1.  A lot of overtime or lots of hours involved.
> > 2.  High Stress.
> > In your opinion, to what extent are these two points true? For
> instance,
> > would you consider
> > database administration to be one far more stressful than systems
> > administration or other web
> > related jobs (such as webmastere-commerce expert)?

> > Also, it sounds like it is hard to find a job as an Oracle DBA
> > when all you have is Oracle's DBA Certification (from OCP) but no
> > exsperience.
> > My understanding is that, for this reason, people who want to become
> an
> > Oracle DBA
> > must first work in some database related job.
> > I have a couple of questions on this:
> > 1. Which jobs would help me gain the necessary experience to later
> become
> > a DBA?
> > (d

> > 2. How long would I have to wait before I can go into DB
> administration?

> > Thank you very much for your time,
> > H_H

> Sent via Deja.com http://www.***.com/
> Before you buy.



Tue, 08 Apr 2003 22:32:16 GMT
 Becoming an Oracle DBA (part 3)

Quote:
> Without wishing to seem trite, my only real suggestion is to drop Oracle 8
> as quickly as possible, and install 8.1.6 or better, and concentrate on the
> 8i material.

> I speak as one who thought the sun was 8.0.x but who has recently discovered
> that it was merely a stepping stone to the much better things in 8i.

Just remember that a whole pile of the real world is stuck on 7.3.4 for a
variety of good reasons.  I could wish I was on 8i, but until the
software vendor puts out an 8i version, I'm stuck with 7.3.4.

My advice is learn how things work.  If you understand the theory behind
the program it does not matter what the program is.  Databases are
databases be they Oracle, Sybase, or SQL Server.  I have worked on 7
different operating systems in my career.  Once I understood the theory
it was very easy to learn another one.

Liz



Wed, 18 Jun 1902 08:00:00 GMT
 
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