MAC or PC? 
Author Message
 MAC or PC?
If I wanted to set up a new filemaker program for 3 or 4 users, and I had
the choice of hardware, should I choose Macs, or PC's.

No hardware sales please, just advice.

many thanks

Tim

PS if this debate has been done to death on this ng before, please forgive
me.



Sat, 20 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 MAC or PC?

Quote:

> If I wanted to set up a new filemaker program for 3 or 4 users, and I had
> the choice of hardware, should I choose Macs, or PC's.

> No hardware sales please, just advice.

> many thanks

> Tim

> PS if this debate has been done to death on this ng before, please forgive
> me.

  If you have your choice of hardware, I would lean toward the Mac's. I have
worked on both Mac and Pc and find that the Mac is easier to use, easier to
network (built in AppleTalk and most now have Ethernet), more reliable and
you don't have to bow to Microsoft. If you want more info/opinion let me
know.


Sat, 20 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 MAC or PC?

Quote:

> If I wanted to set up a new filemaker program for 3 or 4 users, and I had
> the choice of hardware, should I choose Macs, or PC's.

> No hardware sales please, just advice.

> many thanks

> Tim

> PS if this debate has been done to death on this ng before, please forgive
> me.

  I'll try and get in before the flamage.

IMHO

PCs : lower purchase price, higher maintenance and learning costs, lower
resale value.
MACs : higher purchase costs, lower maintenace and learning costs, higher
resale value.

Let's watch those flames come in...............................



Sat, 20 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 MAC or PC?
Hi Tim,

I use both platforms every day with FileMaker.  Assuming all else equal (and
all else is NOT equal) and just focusing on FileMaker specifically, here is
my input:

1 - Your files will run faster on Windows.  Windows uses a less robust
(simpler) scheme for managing data on disks.  Because of this, it tends to
read and write data more quickly.  Since FIleMaker is very busy with disk
reads and writes, Windows can make files fly.  However, the performance
difference is probably not big enough to outweigh issues external to
FileMaker.  Additionally, if you have budget enough for fairly robust
computers, the difference might be hardly noticeable (really fast vs. really
fast + a little more).

2 - Because you will likely network you machines and share files:  Macs are
significantly simpler to setup for network operation.  I would view this as
a more important issue than the speed issue above.

3 - Files look prettier on the Mac.  FileMaker is graphically intensive, and
- all else equal - will look better on a system that represents fonts,
colors, and shapes more accurately.  The importance of this is almost
entirely a matter of _your_ opinion.

If there is _truly_ no implied platform preference outside of FileMaker, I
would lean towards Macintosh.  As I can't believe that your purchase
decision rests solely with FileMaker delivery, I would say make the decision
based on external factors and don't worry too much about FileMaker - it will
work fine on either platform.

Good luck,

Andrew LeCates

p.s. For reference, I believe over 3/4 of our customers with less than 100
employees use Macs with FileMaker.  In much larger organizations, Windows
has almost completely unseated Macintoshes.  The primary inference I make is
that if you don't have (can't afford) some dedicated computer/network
experts, the Mac is simpler to manage.  If you do have a Windows or NT
expert nearby they will probably rather just focus on a Windows platform.
--------------


Quote:

>If I wanted to set up a new filemaker program for 3 or 4 users, and I had
>the choice of hardware, should I choose Macs, or PC's.

>No hardware sales please, just advice.

>many thanks

>Tim

>PS if this debate has been done to death on this ng before, please forgive
>me.



Sat, 20 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 MAC or PC?

I would think that if you are basing your purchase on which-platform
would work better with filemaker, then you should probably lean toward
the mac..

i think there are some significant shortcomings or basic functionality
that is simply missing with filemaker.. IE the first thing i wanted
to do with filemaker, was link it to existing files pictures/text on
my unix web server.. there is nothing in filemaker that would allow you
to automatically set fields to text files or containers to picture
files based on calculations, or other field contents..  
IE picture = PathToWWW & ItemNum & .jpg.
            Global field  field   Constant  

i was able to use applescript to creat this functionality.. it is not
automatic, i must hit a "button" to run the script, but this is far
better than having to walk thru the import picture scenario for every
item..

Applescript is a bit strange (understatement), as scripting languages
go, but the filemaker on mac can interact with applescript, so this, in
itself, will let you do some things that are beyond the bounds of the
calculations and the filemaker scripting language.. i don't think the
windows version has the ability to interact with some external script
language..  i've heard billy is working on some interprocess scripting
setup.. maybe filemaker will support this later.. but for now, i would
imagine that the applescript fmp4 link would make (fmp4 on mac) a bit
more versatile than (fmp4 on windows)..


Sur-Tech / Ami-Tech    (408) 496-6348 Xt 247     Santa Clara CA 95050
                          www.Sur-Tech.com



Sat, 20 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 MAC or PC?

Quote:


> > If I wanted to set up a new filemaker program for 3 or 4 users, and I had
> > the choice of hardware, should I choose Macs, or PC's.

> > No hardware sales please, just advice.

Also, there's no Apple-events equivalent on Windows, which makes a great
deal of difference in things you can do (like Lasso for example, which
cannot work with the PC version of FMPro because of this).

The Mac is definitely the platform of choice for FileMaker.



Sun, 21 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 MAC or PC?
But when it comes to networking and applications with many files, if
you're planning to use FMPro-Server:  I would highly recommend
Windows-NT. It's more reliable and faster even than the G3 Macs - used
as a server. And you get rid of this outdated Apple-Talk...
I've had nothing but problems with Macs as a server (I have used
different machines and everything was installed clean and we always had
crashes at least one till two times a month. Now I can sleep calm.)
Dirk

tim schrieb:

Quote:

> If I wanted to set up a new filemaker program for 3 or 4 users, and I had
> the choice of hardware, should I choose Macs, or PC's.

> No hardware sales please, just advice.

> many thanks

> Tim

> PS if this debate has been done to death on this ng before, please forgive
> me.



Sat, 27 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 MAC or PC?

Quote:

> But when it comes to networking and applications with many files, if
> you're planning to use FMPro-Server:  I would highly recommend
> Windows-NT. It's more reliable and faster even than the G3 Macs - used
> as a server. And you get rid of this outdated Apple-Talk...
> I've had nothing but problems with Macs as a server (I have used
> different machines and everything was installed clean and we always had
> crashes at least one till two times a month. Now I can sleep calm.)
> Dirk

FileMaker is perfectly capable over TCP/IP, no need to mess w/AppleTalk.
Also, our 9650 servers, all five of them, have been up an running without
a reboot since I upgraded the system software on Feb 8 1998.  Honest...
they are web servers and get hit alot.  No crashes... Maybe the poster had
problems with previous system software, but 8.0 and 8.1 could not be more
stable.

And don't forget about time invested in skills already learned...if you
know Macs, setting up and maintaining an NT server is NOT something you'll
just catch on to!  That means more expense in consulting, training, tech
support.

We run a complete network of public net terminals called the "e.port
Public Information Network" and the entire thing is Mac based, servers for
dynamic content delivery, transactions, e.mail engine, etc.... and clients
are all G3s.  These are computers in a public place and have never had a
crash or lockup.

2 years ago I wouldn't have recommended doing that with Macs, but they
have proven to be more stable for us (and we vowed to pick the best
platform for all considerations) than a Windows box.

Good luck!



Sun, 28 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 MAC or PC?
Bill Leonard schrieb:

Quote:
> FileMaker is perfectly capable over TCP/IP, no need to mess w/AppleTalk.

O.K., but NT is a lot faster, esp. when you have many simultan users. I
haven't noticed an increase in performance after switching from
Apple-Talk to Tcp using the same mac as a server.

Quote:
> Also, our 9650 servers, all five of them, have been up an running without
> a reboot since I upgraded the system software on Feb 8 1998.  Honest...
> they are web servers and get hit alot.  No crashes... Maybe the poster had
> problems with previous system software, but 8.0 and 8.1 could not be more
> stable.

I'm sure, you're perfectly right. I was talking about normal
desktop-macs in comparison to pentiums with NT. If I'm informed right,
Apple has done something to improve the networking facilities esp. of
their dedicated servers (but they are still slower than NT-Servers esp.
with Filemaker. This was even confirmed by the german mac-zine MacUp. By
the way: I'm not up to date with the actual range of Mac-Servers. Do
they use the normal Mac-OS? Without anything special? As I got offers
for Mac-Servers a year ago, the software alone was more expensive as a
complete Dell-Pentium Server including the software!

Quote:

> And don't forget about time invested in skills already learned...if you
> know Macs, setting up and maintaining an NT server is NOT something you'll
> just catch on to!  That means more expense in consulting, training, tech
> support.

Yes. But you can't do the things NT allows you with a standard Mac-Os. I
have lived in both worlds most of the time. And the Unix-Macs without
support (in german)  weren't to much fun either - but good machines
nevertheless. And for FM NT-Workstation does the same.
I still don't get it, how FM-Server works around all the security stuff
of NT and if it makes the whole thing more or less secure (it's an
advantage, that the users don't see the server, don't have to register,
but I'm not so sure...). And I have to say, I like Macs, but I don't get
that ease-of-use-thing. Till today I've met no normal user, from
secretairies to doctors to university profs to students, who just want
to be that - normal users, who understood - for exemple -
the way appletalk functions in printer communication using different
ports...

Quote:
> We run a complete network of public net terminals called the "e.port
> Public Information Network" and the entire thing is Mac based, servers for
> dynamic content delivery, transactions, e.mail engine, etc.... and clients
> are all G3s.  These are computers in a public place and have never had a
> crash or lockup.

I hadn't luck even with system 8. It's a FM-Application with 30 Files,
entirely 90 MB and 15 users average. It's even hard for me to legitimate
Macs as clients because they aren't allowed in hospitals because of
their lack of security but a lot of our staff loves them and I'm not
getting tired of FileGuard, removing floppies (hello I-Mac) and locking
up Scsi-Ports (grin)!

Quote:

> 2 years ago I wouldn't have recommended doing that with Macs, but they
> have proven to be more stable for us (and we vowed to pick the best
> platform for all considerations) than a Windows box.

> Good luck!

You too!
Dirk


Mon, 29 Jan 2001 03:00:00 GMT
 
 [ 9 post ] 

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